AddleyClarkFineWines

Melbourne Gin Company

Grower - Andrew Marks

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Frank Moorhouse in his book Martini – a memoir states, “Every time it is served, the martini represents a journey towards an unattainably ideal drink”.

 Andrew Marks, Gembrook Hill

The idea of endlessly pursuing a perfection that does not exist is something well known to passionate winemakers. Having a winemaking background we thought we would delve into the mysteries of gin production. This was largely brought about by our fascination with martinis and all things gin.

The notion of the “unattainable ideal drink” led us into a series of trials and experiments and we have become fully immersed in the alchemy of batch distillation and the extraction of exotic and local botanicals.

The MGC doffs its hat to London Dry Gin with the two major components being juniper berries and coriander seed. There are 11 botanicals in total (not including a lot of love) with the grapefruit peel and rosemary coming from the garden at Gembrook Hill Vineyard.

The other botanicals are macadamia, sandalwood, honey lemon myrtle and organic navel orange, which are all sourced from Australia. The exotics in the mix are angelica root, orris root and cassia bark.

Each botanical is distilled separately and then blended to our recipe – essentially a winemakers approach. We use a copper pot baine-marie alembic still. A still traditionally used for making perfume. This allows us to preserve the delicate nature of the botanicals we work with.

The final component is the water used to break the gin back. We use Gembrook rainwater which is pure and fresh and allows the botanicals to shine through. At only 60kms from Melbourne this local source contributes to the definition of the unique “Melbourne Dry Gin” style.

The MGC is not chill filtered. We didn’t want to take out the oils that contribute so much to the aromatics and mouth feel of the gin. So when the gin is very cold the oils become slightly insoluble and form a light haze. The French use the word louche to describe this. In a different context someone who is louche is of a shady character! Each bottle is numbered to reflect the small batches in which it is made.